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Track: Sponsored Solutions Track I

Location: Pacific BC

Day of week: Monday

Industry practitioners and technical product managers from leading vendors demonstrate solutions to some of today's toughest software development challenges in the areas of performance monitoring, Big Data, software delivery, scalability, and more.

Track Host: Nitin Bharti

Managing Editor and Product Manager C4Media

Nitin has helped build several notable online developer communities including TheServerSide.com, DZone, and The Code Project. He is known for his extensive editorial work in the Enterprise Java, .NET, SOA, and Agile communities. As Managing Editor and Product Manager at C4Media - the producer of InfoQ.com and QCon events - Nitin continues to pursue his primary passion: helping spread knowledge and innovation throughout the enterprise software development community.

10:35am - 11:25am

Grading Observability (Note: Not a Product Pitch!)

Nobody denies the importance of observability in modern production software: with microservices adding scale, concurrency, and frequent deploys, it’s getting harder and harder to answer even basic questions about application behavior. The conventional wisdom has been that metrics, logging and tracing are “the three pillars” of observability, yet organizations check these boxes and still find themselves grasping at straws during emergencies. The problem is that metrics, logs, and traces are just data – if what we need is a car, all we’re talking about is the fuel. We will continue to disappoint ourselves until we reframe observability around two fundamental activities:

(1) detection and

(2) refinement.

For effective observability, “detection” must be both robust and precise, overcoming cardinality concerns amid massive data volumes. “Refinement” revolves around rapid hypothesis testing: we must understand global context across service boundaries, decipher the side-effects of contention under peak load, and present everything with historical reference points to understand what’s changed and what’s normal behavior. In this session, we’ll summarize the contemporary observability dogma, then present a new observability scorecard for objectively reasoning about and assessing observability solutions for modern distributed systems.

Ben Sigelman, CEO and co-founder @LightStepHQ, Co-creator @OpenTracing API standard

11:50am - 12:40pm

Observability: The Health of Every Request

A popular approach to monitoring looks at the health of systems and infrastructure components first and then the things that run inside of it. I'd like to offer a different perspective that it is the health of every request that truly matters. In this session, we'll explore what that means, strategies around observability, tooling to that helps us find out request health, and the changing landscape of "external monitoring" to "internal observation".

Nathan LeClaire, Senior Engineer @honeycomb.io

1:40pm - 2:30pm

Assisted Warmup with the Zing JVM

Over the last 20 years of Java JIT compiler development, the focus has been on generating good throughput over the long run. The Zing VM is designed to eliminate most of the cold warmup time. In this talk Ivan will present three JIT compiler technologies that are designed to reach peak throughput from the first transaction. The talk also outlines the patterns in Java code that make this task difficult and tips on how to write AOT-friendly code.

Ivan Krylov, Lead Developer @AzulSystems

2:55pm - 3:45pm

Ballerina - Cloud Native Programming Language

Crazy customer demand has caused companies like Google and Amazon to build massively disaggregated architectures in order to scale. Massively disaggregated approaches like microservices, serverless, and APIs are becoming the norm for us all. These disaggregated components are network accessible as programmable endpoints. The apps we will write increasingly depend upon these endpoints. Integration is the discipline of resilient communication between endpoints. It isn’t easy. The challenges include compensation, transactions, events, circuit breakers, discovery, and protocol handling, and mediation.

Ballerina makes it easy to write resilient services that orchestrate and integrate across distributed endpoints. It’s a language that understands protocols, endpoints, transactions, workers, JSON, XML, asynchrony, and tainted data as first-class constructs.

Ballerina is a compiled language with its own VM technology. Services execute as servers, microservices, and serverless functions packaged for deployment into any infrastructure including Kubernetes.

It’s the first language that understands the architecture around it - the compiler is environment aware, and includes or integrates circuit breakers, identity servers, API gateways, and message brokers.

This session will cover Ballerina’s language and runtime model while building a variety of integrations. We’ll also cover how the Ballerina open source community operates and how you can get involved.

Sameera Jayasoma, Director, Platform Architecture @wso2

4:10pm - 5:00pm

Autonomous Microservices

Everybody loves microservices, but it's difficult to do it right. Distributed systems are much more complex to develop and maintain. Over time, you may even miss the simplicity of old monoliths. In this session, we'll look at a combination of infrastructure, architecture, and design principles to bulletproof your microservices and make them easy to maintain with a combination of high scalability, elasticity, fault tolerance, and resilience.

This session will include a discussion of microservices blueprints like: asynchronous communications, avoiding cascading failures in synchronous calls, and how distributed NoSQL databases become valuable in terms of scalability and performance when combined with your microservices in a Kubernetes deployment.

Hod Greeley, Developer Advocate @couchbase

5:25pm - 6:15pm

3 Common Pitfalls in Microservice Integration

Integrating microservices and taming distributed systems is hard. In this talk, I will present three challenges I've observed in real-life projects and discuss how to avoid them.

Communication is complex. With everything being distributed failures are normal so you need sophisticated failure handling strategies (e.g. stateful retry). Asynchronicity requires you to handle timeouts. This is not only about milliseconds, systems get much more resilient when you can wait for minutes, hours or even longer.

Distributed transactions cannot simply be delegated to protocols like XA. So you need to solve the requirement to retain consistency in case of failures.

I will not only use slides but also demonstrate concrete source code examples available on GitHub.

Patricio Zambrano Garcia, Technical Consultant @Camunda

Tracks

  • Tech Ethics: The Intersection of Human Welfare & STEM

    What does it mean to be ethical in software? Hear how the discussion is evolving and what is being said in ethics.

  • Optimizing Yourself: Human Skills for Individuals

    Better teams start with a better self. Learn practical skills for IC.

  • Modern Data Architectures

    Today’s systems move huge volumes of data. Hear how places like LinkedIn, Facebook, Uber and more built their systems and learn from their mistakes.

  • Practices of DevOps & Lean Thinking

    Practical approaches using DevOps and a lean approach to delivering software.

  • Microservices Patterns & Practices

    What's the last mile for deploying your service? Learn techniques from the world's most innovative shops on managing and operating Microservices at scale.

  • Bare Knuckle Performance

    Killing latency and getting the most out of your hardware

  • Architectures You've Always Wondered About

    Next-gen architectures from the most admired companies in software, such as Netflix, Google, Facebook, Twitter, & more

  • Machine Learning for Developers

    AI/ML is more approachable than ever. Discover how deep learning and ML is being used in practice. Topics include: TensorFlow, TPUs, Keras, PyTorch & more. No PhD required.

  • Production Readiness: Building Resilient Systems

    Making systems resilient involves people and tech. Learn about strategies being used from chaos testing to distributed systems clustering.

  • Regulation, Risk and Compliance

    With so much uncertainty, how do you bulkhead your organization and technology choices? Learn strategies for dealing with uncertainty.

  • Languages of Infrastructure

    This track explores languages being used to code the infrastructure. Expect practices on toolkits and languages like Cloudformation, Terraform, Python, Go, Rust, Erlang.

  • Building & Scaling High-Performing Teams

    To have a high-performing team, everybody on it has to feel and act like an owner. Organizational health and psychological safety are foundational underpinnings to support ownership.

  • Evolving the JVM

    The JVM continues to evolve. We’ll look at how things are evolving. Covering Kotlin, Clojure, Java, OpenJDK, and Graal. Expect polyglot, multi-VM, performance, and more.

  • Trust, Safety & Security

    Privacy, confidentiality, safety and security: learning from the frontlines.

  • JavaScript & Transpiler/WebAssembly Track

    JavaScript is the language of the web. Latest practices for JavaScript development in and how transpilers are affecting the way we work. We’ll also look at the work being done with WebAssembly.

  • Living on the Edge: The World of Edge Compute From Device to Application Edge

    Applied, practical & real-world deep-dive into industry adoption of OS, containers and virtualization, including Linux on.

  • Software Supply Chain

    Securing the container image supply chain (containers + orchestration + security + DevOps).

  • Modern CS in the Real World

    Thoughts pushing software forward, including consensus, CRDT's, formal methods & probabilistic programming.